Careful, these 2 popular groceries have been pulled from supermarket shelves

Companies recall products all the time, for reasons that range from after-the-fact safety issues discovered…

Companies recall products all the time, for reasons that range from after-the-fact safety issues discovered to problems that happened during the manufacturing process. When it comes to food recalls, though, there’s a particular urgency in communicating the issue to the public. Because people’s health and in extreme cases maybe even their lives are at stake.

We report on recalls and especially food recalls all the time, and the latest recalls to mention include a few products that you might have picked up on a recent trip to the grocery store. As you’ll see below, they include raisins as well as packages of frozen diced green peppers.

Food recalls: Lehi Valley yogurt raisins

First up is a recall tied to one of the most common food allergies, which concerns peanuts.

Even small traces of peanuts in food products can lead to severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. That’s why anyone affected should pay close attention to product recalls like the recently disclosed Lehi Valley yogurt raisins recall.

The company announced that three different Lehi Valley products might contain peanuts. The problem? That allergen is not clearly listed on the product labels. The products might have been inadvertently contaminated during the production process. And, as a result, people suffering from peanut allergies might eat these, thinking that the yogurt raisins are safe to enjoy.

The Lehi Valley Trading Company announced a nationwide recall a few days ago. The action involves a total of three yogurt raisins products. They include:

  • Snack-Worthy 10 oz Yogurt Raisins, UPC 7911400668, with a Best By date Sept. 12, 2022 and the Lot Code 222268.
  • Woody’s Smokehouse 12.3 oz Yogurt Raisins, UPC 9524865531, with a Best By date of Aug 23, 2022.
  • Texas Best Smokehouse 8 oz Yogurt Raisins, UPC 9524832055, with a Best By date of Aug. 23, 2022.
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The good news is that Lehi Valley says that it hasn’t received any reports of illness or sickness due to the consumption of the yogurt raisins involved in the recall. However, given the months-long shelf life of these products, the risk of allergic reactions is nevertheless very serious.

Giant Eagle frozen diced green peppers recall

A shopper is shown pushing a cart down a grocery aisle. Image source: Piman Khrutmuang/Adobe

Another of the most recent food recalls to mention is relevant to anyone who might have frozen bags of diced green peppers in their freezer. Giant Eagle is recalling certain frozen diced green peppers products, because of a potential risk of Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The danger here is that Listeria can survive freezing temperatures, and the contaminated food will not necessarily look or smell spoiled.

Importantly: There’s also not one but two Giant Eagle recalls for frozen diced green peppers that consumers need to be aware of. FoodSafetyNews reported the one concerning packages of peppers with “Best By” dates of Oct. 14, 2023. Separately, FoodPoisoningBulletin identified two separate recalls for the same product, including the frozen green peppers that expire in late 2023.

Both announcements cite contamination with the same bacteria as being responsible for the frozen green pepper recalls. The first one concerns bags that expire on Oct. 14, 2023. The company has recalled 699 cases, each containing 12 packages — and each package weighing 10 oz.

The UPC isn’t available for the products, so you should be looking for the expiration date on the package.

The second Giant Eagle recall

The second recall is still ongoing. And it concerns a much larger quantity of diced green peppers. Specifically, a potential 20,825 pounds of peppers might have been contaminated with Listeria. Look for the following codes and expirations dates to determine if your bags come from the recalled batches:

  • R16372, expires  March 12, 2023
  • R16514, expires Sept. 30, 2022
  • R17422, expires Jan. 21, 2023
  • R17117, expires August 12, 2023
  • R17133, expires April 14, 2023
  • R18388, expires Oct. 14, 2023
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